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A scientific review of 52 studies recently concluded that humans on average consume a credit card’s worth of microplastic each week.
latimes.com/environment/story/2019-10-02/california-microplastics-ocean-study
Climate change is severely straining the world’s oceans, creating profound risks for coastal cities and food supplies, a U.N. report finds.
www.nytimes.com/2019/09/25/climate/climate-change-oceans-united-nations.html
Countries agreed to rein in emissions in an effort to avert climate catastrophes. They've failed, according to the latest United Nations report.
www.nytimes.com/2019/11/26/climate/greenhouse-gas-emissions-carbon.html
In the Santa Barbara Channel, an underwater sound system tries to keep whales and ships apart
www.latimes.com/california/story/2019-08-14
The North Atlantic right whales all were found in the Gulf of St. Lawrence recently, dealing a setback to the shrinking population.
www.nytimes.com/2019/06/26/science/right-whale-death-endangered-species.html
Where the United States entombed waste from nuclear testing almost four decades ago, contamination is spreading from the site’s tainted groundwater into the ocean and the food chain.
www.latimes.com/science/environment/la-me-marshall-islands-dome-is-leaking-radiation-20190528-story.html
Experience our planet's natural beauty and examine how climate change impacts all living creatures in this ambitious documentary of spectacular scope.
www.ourplanet.com/en/
“One Planet” appeals to the sense of wonder as viscerally as any of its predecessors, but to a purpose. Here is this beautiful, rare thing, each episode says. It didn’t used to be rare! But it is now. And here is how we’re responsible. And here is a tangible thing we might do to fix it. The arc of each installment runs from beauty to loss to a concrete, hopeful example of a battered ecosystem that’s recovered.
www.nytimes.com/arts/television/our-planet-netflix-review.html
On Rennell, an impoverished Pacific island, mining had already scarred the land. Now an oil spill has polluted the water and threatens a World Heritage site.
www.nytimes.com/world/asia/oil-spill-rennell-mining-solomons.html
Time may be running out for California’s most infamous fish. Despite a decades-long rescue effort, the tiny delta smelt appears closer than ever to vanishing from its only natural home, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Now, some worry it won’t be long before the only place the once-abundant species exists is within the confines of an artificial tank.
enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx
Global warming has caused such extensive damage to the Great Barrier Reef that scientists say its coral may never recover. According to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature, baby coral in Australia's Great Barrier Reef have declined by 89% due to mass bleaching in 2016 and 2017.
www.cbsnews.com/news/great-barrier-reef-dying-climate-change-caused-decrease-in-new-coral-study-says/
The Thwaites Glacier on Antarctica’s western coast has long been considered one of the most unstable on the continent. Now, scientists are worried about the discovery of an enormous underwater cavity that will probably speed up the glacier’s decay.
www.nytimes.com/climate/thwaites-glacier-antarctica-cavity.html
Two shark researchers who came face-to-face with what could be one of the largest great whites ever recorded are using their encounter as an opportunity to push for legislation that would protect sharks in Hawaii.
www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-great-white-shark-
Earth’s oceans had their warmest year on record in 2018, a stark indication of the enormous amount of heat being absorbed by the sea as greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, scientists reported Wednesday. The analysis by an international team of scientists confirms that the oceans are heating up much faster than previously recognized and that the pace of warming has accelerated sharply since the 1990s.
https://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity
Greenland’s enormous ice sheet is melting at such an accelerated rate that it may have reached a “tipping point” and could become a major factor in sea-level rise around the world within two decades, scientists said in a study published on Monday.
www.nytimes.com/climate/greenland-ice.html
Scientists say the world’s oceans are warming far more quickly than previously thought, a finding with dire implications for climate change because almost all the excess heat absorbed by the planet ends up stored in their waters.
www.nytimes.com/climate/ocean-warming-climate-change.html
Persistent warming in the Arctic is pushing the region into “uncharted territory” and increasingly affecting the continental United States, scientists said Tuesday. The Arctic has been warmer over the last five years than at any time since records began in 1900, the report found, and the region is warming at twice the rate as the rest of the planet.
www.nytimes.com/climate/arctic-warming
In the video, Ms. Gill zoomed in on a six-foot-long, stiff, glistening dolphin carcass, its mouth frozen into a toothy smile. The creature was one of more than 20 dead bottlenose dolphins that had washed up on local beaches in recent days.
www.nytimes.com/business/media/climate-change-news-media-red-tide-florida.html
The underwater forests — huge, sprawling tangles of brown seaweed — are in many ways just as important to the oceans as trees are to the land. Like trees, they absorb carbon emissions and they provide critical habitat and food for a wide range of species. But when climate change helped trigger a 60-fold explosion of purple urchins off Northern California’s coast, the urchins went on a feeding frenzy and the kelp was devoured.
www.nytimes.com/climate/kelp-climate-change-california.html
Hundreds of turtles, dolphins and whales become stranded every year on Thailand’s beaches after plastic impedes their mobility or clogs their insides. Some are lifeless on arrival, biologists say, and their deaths barely register with the public.
www.nytimes.com/world/asia/thailand-whale-plastics-pollution.html
A worldwide catastrophe is underway among an extraordinary group of birds — the marathon migrants we know as shorebirds. Numbers of some species are falling so quickly that many biologists fear an imminent planet-wide wave of extinctions.
www.nytimes.com/interactive/opinion/shorebirds-extinction-climate-change.html
Something ominous was happening in the turquoise waters of Sepetiba Bay, a booming port outside Rio de Janeiro. Beginning late last year, fishermen were coming across the scarred and emaciated carcasses of dolphins, sometimes five a day, bobbing up to the surface.
www.nytimes.com/world/americas/brazil-dolphins-sepetiba-bay.html
In the Pacific Ocean between California and Hawaii, hundreds of miles from any major city, plastic bottles, children’s toys, broken electronics, abandoned fishing nets and millions more fragments of debris are floating in the water — at least 87,000 tons’ worth, researchers said Thursday.
www.nytimes.com/climate/great-pacific-garbage-patch.html
After years of effort, scientists at the Fish and Wildlife Service had a moment of celebration as they wrapped up a comprehensive analysis of the threat that three widely used pesticides present to hundreds of endangered species, like the kit fox and the seaside sparrow.
READ MORE: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/26/us/politics/endangered-species-david-bernhardt.html
Less than two dozen of the tiny porpoises remain in the wild. But there’s plenty the government can do to avert its extinction.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/19/opinion/mexico-porpoise-extinction.html
A beached whale found in the Philippines on Saturday died with 88 pounds of plastic trash inside its body, an unusually large amount even by the grim standards of what is a common threat to marine wildlife.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/18/world/asia/whale-plastics-philippines.html